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Awards

Combat and Commendation Medals

  1. Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM)

    History

    The Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM) shall only be awarded to officers of the Armed Forces of the United States whose exceptional performance of duty and contributions to national security or defense have been at the highest levels. Such officers have direct and ultimate responsibility for a major activity or program that significantly influences the policies of the U.S. Government. Only under the most unusual circumstances will the DDSM be awarded as an impact award for outstanding TDY achievement. The DDSM is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally distinguished service and to honor an individual's accomplishments over a sustained period.

    Prerequisites

    May be awarded to a Commissioned Officer or Staff Non-Commissioned Officer of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who have made significant contributions and influences to the policies of the unit.

  2. Navy Distinguished Service Medal (NDSM)

    History

    At the start of World War I, the Department of the Navy had the Medal of Honor as the only decoration with which to recognize heroism. To recognize acts deserving recognition, but at a level below that required for the Medal of Honor, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal and the Navy Cross were created by Public Law 253 on 4 February 1919. The law made the award retroactive to 6 April 1917. The first award of the decoration was a posthumous presentation to Brigadier General Charles A. Doyen, USMC, on 13 March 1919. Originally senior in precedence to the Navy Cross, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal assumed its current place below the Navy Cross by Congressional action on 7 August 1942.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a Commissioned Officer or Senior Non-Commissioned Officer of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has distinguished themselves in non-combative exceptionally meritorious service or achievement in a greater position of leadership. Additionally, a member must have time in service of a minimum of 2 years.

  3. Silver Star (SS)

    History

    The Citation Star was established as a result of an Act of Congress on July 9, 1918 (65th Congress, Sess II, Chapter 143, page 873) and was promulgated in War Department Bulletin No. 43 dated 1918. It was retroactive to include those cited for gallantry in action in previous campaigns back to the Spanish-American War. Per letter from General Jervey, Office of the Chief of Staff, dated February 26, 1926, is quoted in part: The Secretary of War directs as follows - The following is the amended version of paragraph 187 of Army Regulation: "No more than one Medal of Honor or one Distinguished Service Cross or one Distinguished Service Medal shall be issued to any one person, but for each succeeding or act sufficient to justify the award of a Medal of Honor or Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, respectively, a bronze oak leaf cluster, shall be issued in lieu thereof; and for each citation of an officer or enlisted man for gallantry in action, published in orders from headquarters of a force commanded by a general officer, not warranting the issue of a Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, he shall wear a silver star, 3/16 inch in diameter, as prescribed in Uniform Regulations." Army Regulation 600-40, paragraph 48, September 27, 1921, specified that the Citation Star would be worn above the clasp, on the ribbon of the service medal for the campaign for service in which the citations were given. On July 19, 1932, the Secretary of War approved the Silver Star medal to replace the Citation Star. This design placed the Citation Star on a bronze pendant suspended from the ribbon design. The star was no longer attached to a service or campaign ribbon. Authorization for the Silver Star was placed into law by an Act of Congress for the Navy on August 7, 1942 and an Act of Congress for the Army on December 15, 1942. The primary reason for congressional authorization was the desire to award the medal to civilians as well as the Army. The current statutory authorization for the Silver Star Medal is Title 10, United States Code, Section 3746.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who is cited for gallantry in action, while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States, engaged in military operation involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed forces in which the United States is not a belligerent party, for actions that do not warrant the Medal of Honor or Navy Cross.

  4. Defense Superior Service Medal (DSSM)

    History

    The Defense Superior Service Medal (DSSM) is the second highest award bestowed by the Department of Defense. Awarded in the name of the Secretary of Defense, the award is presented to members of the U.S. Armed Forces who perform "superior meritorious service in a position of significant responsibility." Created on February 6th, 1976 by President Gerald R. Ford's Executive Order 11904, it is typically awarded only to senior officers of the Flag and General Officer grade.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a Commissioned Officer or Senior Non-Commissioned Officer of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who renders superior non-combat meritorious service or achievement in a position of leadership below that required for the Defense Superior Service Medal. Additionally, a member must have time in service of a minimum of 1 year.

  5. Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)

    History

    The first award of the Distinguished Flying Cross was made by President Calvin Coolidge on May 2, 1927, to ten aviators of the U.S. Army Air Corps who had participated in the Army Pan American Flight which took place from December 21, 1926, to May 2, 1927. Two of the airmen died in a mid-air collision trying to land at Buenos Aires on February 26, 1927, and received their awards posthumously. The award had only been authorized by Congress the previous year and no medals had yet been struck, so the Pan American airmen initially received only certificates. Among the ten airmen were Major Herbert Dargue, Captains Ira C. Eaker and Muir S. Fairchild, and 1st Lt. Ennis C. Whitehead.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has distinguished themselves in support of operations by showing "great heroism or extraordinary action" in an aerial flight as Pilot or Crew Chief. To justify this decoration for heroism, an act in the face of danger, well above those actions performed by others engaged in similar flight operations, is required. May be awarded for a single action or series of actions that go above and beyond the normal duties of an aviator.

  6. Bronze Star (BS)

    History

    General George C. Marshall, in a memorandum to President Roosevelt dated February 3, 1944, wrote: "The fact that the ground troops, Infantry in particular, lead miserable lives of extreme discomfort and are the ones who must close in personal combat with the enemy, makes the maintenance of their morale of great importance. The award of the Air Medal have had an adverse reaction on the ground troops, particularly the Infantry Riflemen who are now suffering the heaviest losses, air or ground, in the Army, and enduring the greatest hardships." The Air Medal had been adopted two years earlier to raise airmen’s morale. President Roosevelt authorized the Bronze Star Medal by Executive Order 9419 dated 4 February 1944, retroactive to 7 December 1941. This authorization was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 3, dated 10 February 1944. The Executive Order was amended by President Kennedy, per Executive Order 11046 dated 24 August 1962, to expand the authorization to include those serving with friendly forces. As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall’s support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has distinguishes themselves by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight, while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States, engaged in military operation involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed forces in which the United States is not a belligerent party, in competitive match below that required for a Silver Star.

  7. Purple Heart (PH)

    History

    The original Purple Heart, designated as the Badge of Military Merit, was established by General George Washington by order from his headquarters at Newburgh, New York, August 7, 1782. The writings of General Washington quoted in part: "The General ever desirous to cherish a virtuous ambition in his soldiers, as well as to foster and encourage every species of Military Merit, directs that whenever any singularly meritorious action is performed, the author of it shall be permitted to wear on his facings over the left breast, the figure of a heart in purple cloth or silk, edged with narrow lace or binding. Not only instances of unusual gallantry, but also of extraordinary fidelity and essential service in any way shall meet with a due reward". So far as the known surviving records show, this honor badge was granted to only three men, all of them noncommissioned officers: Sergeant Daniel Bissell of the 2d Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line; Sergeant William Brown of the 5th Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line, and Sergeant Elijah Churchill of the 2d Continental Dragoons, which was also a Connecticut Regiment. The original Purple Heart depicted on the first page is a copy of the badge awarded to Sergeant Elijah Churchill and is now owned by the New Windsor Cantonment, National Temple Hill Association, PO Box 525, Vails Gate, NY 12584. The only other known original badge is the badge awarded to Sergeant William Brown and is in the possession of The Society of the Cincinnati, New Hampshire Branch but differs in design by not having any lettering embroidered on the heart and the leaves are at the top only with a larger spray of leaves at the base. Subsequent to the Revolution, the Order of the Purple Heart had fallen into disuse and no further awards were made. By Order of the President of the United States, the Purple Heart was revived on the 200th Anniversary of George Washington's birth, out of respect to his memory and military achievements, by War Department General Orders No. 3, dated 22 February 1932. The criteria was announced in War Department Circular dated 22 February 1932 and authorized award to soldiers, upon their request, who had been awarded the Meritorious Service Citation Certificate or were authorized to wear wound chevrons subsequent to 5 April 1917. During the early period of World War II (7 Dec 41 to 22 Sep 43), the Purple Heart was awarded both for wounds received in action against the enemy and for meritorious performance of duty. With the establishment of the Legion of Merit, by an Act of Congress, the practice of awarding the Purple Heart for meritorious service was discontinued. By Executive Order 9277, dated 3 December 1942, the decoration was extended to be applicable to all services and the order required that regulations of the Services be uniform in application as far as practicable. This executive order also authorized award only for wounds received. Executive Order 10409, dated 12 February 1952, revised authorizations to include the Service Secretaries subject to approval of the Secretary of Defense. Executive Order 11016, dated 25 April 1962, included provisions for posthumous award of the Purple Heart. Executive Order 12464, dated 23 February 1984, authorized award of the Purple Heart as a result of terrorist attacks or while serving as part of a peacekeeping force subsequent to 28 March 1973. The Senate approved an amendment to the 1985 Defense Authorization Bill on 13 June 1985, which changed the precedent from immediately above the Good Conduct Medal to immediately above the Meritorious Service Medals. Public Law 99-145 authorized the award for wounds received as a result of "friendly fire". Public Law 104-106 expanded the eligibility date, authorizing award of the Purple Heart to a former prisoner of war who was wounded before 25 April 1962. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year1998 (Public Law 105-85) changed the criteria to delete authorization for award of the Purple Heart Medal to any civilian national of the United States while serving under competent authority in any capacity with the Armed Forces. This change was effective 18 May 1998.

    Prerequisites

    May be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has been rendered a critical casualty during a combat operation, and has been successfully MEDEVAC to a field hospital. This may be issued once per deployment.

  8. Meritorious Service Medal (MSM)

    History

    At Tri-Department Awards Conference, 5-6 February 1968, there was a discussion on the need for a third meritorious award to provide appropriate recognition for noncombat achievement or service comparable to the Bronze Star Medal for combat achievement or service. It was felt that the Legion of Merit’s prestige was slipping because it was being used with increasing frequency to reward service below Legion of Merit standard, but higher than that required for the Commendation Medal. A proposed executive order was prepared in April 1968 and forwarded for approval to the Military Departments. An ad hoc committee was formed by the Secretary of Defense (M&RA) to select a name. On 8 November 1968, the committee unanimously approved the name "Meritorious Service Medal". President Johnson established the Meritorious Service Medal per Executive Order No. 11448 dated 16 January 1969. The Executive Order was amended by President Reagan per Executive Order 12312, dated 2 July 1981, to authorize award to members of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations. The decoration was designed by Mr. Jay Morris, The Institute of Heraldry, and the design was approved by the committee on 20 March 1969. The ribbon design purposely follows the colors used for the Legion of Merit to reflect the parallel between the two medals. The eagle, symbol of the nation, stands on laurel branches denoting achievement. The star is used to represent the military service and the rays emanating therefrom denote the constant efforts of individuals to achieve through excellent and meritorious service.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a Commissioned Officer or Senior Non-Commissioned Officer of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit distinguished themselves by outstanding non-combat meritorious achievement or service below that required for the Defense Superior Service Medal. Additionally, a member must have time in service of a minimum of 6 months.

  9. Air Medal (AM)

    History

    The Air Medal is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the armed forces of the United States, shall have distinguished himself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight. Awards may be made to recognize single acts of merit or heroism or for meritorious service. Award of the Air Medal is primarily intended to recognize those personnel who are on current crew member or non-crew member flying status which requires them to participate in aerial flight on a regular and frequent basis in the performance of their primary duties. However, it may also be awarded to certain other individuals whose combat duties require regular and frequent flying in other than a passenger status or individuals who perform a particularly noteworthy act while performing the function of a crew member but who are not on flying status. These individuals must make a discernible contribution to the operational land combat mission or to the mission of the aircraft in flight. Examples of personnel whose combat duties require them to fly include those in the attack elements of units involved in air-land assaults against an armed enemy and those directly involved in airborne command and control of combat operations. Involvement in such activities, normally at the brigade/group level and below, serves only to establish eligibility for award of the Air Medal; the degree of heroism, meritorious achievement or exemplary service determines who should receive the award. Awards will not be made to individuals who use air transportation solely for the purpose of moving from point to point in a combat zone.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has distinguished themselves by heroic or meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight as Pilot or Crew Chief., under flight orders, in which does not warrant the Distinguished Flying Cross.

  10. Joint Service Commendation Medal (JSCM)

    History

    The Joint Service Commendation Medal was created in 1963. This award is intended for senior service on a joint military staff and is senior in precedence to service-specific Commendation Medals. As such, it is worn above the service Commendation Medals on a military uniform. As a joint award, multiple awards are denoted with an oak leaf cluster regardless of service.

    Prerequisites

    May be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has attended at minimum three joint missions or trainings hosted by another United States based unit/clan event and distinguishes themselves by showing professionalism befitting a member of the 2MRB RU.

  11. Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal

    History

    Awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or marine corps (including foreign military personnel), distinguishes him/herself after 6 December 1941, by heroic or meritorious achievement or service. To merit this award, the acts or services must be accomplished or performed in a manner above that normally expected and sufficient to distinguish the individual above those performing similar services.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit for meritorious service or achievement in a combat or non-combat situation, in competitive match below that required for a Bronze Star, Air Medal, or Meritorious Service Medal. Additionally, a member must have time in service of a minimum of 3 months to receive the award for meritorious service when combat is not involved. This award will be issued with a V device if combat is involved.

  12. Joint Service Achievement Medal (JSAM)

    History

    The Joint Service Achievement Medal was designed by Jay Morris and sculpted by Donald Borja, both of the Army's Institute of Heraldry. The bronze medal is 1-7/16 inches in overall diameter, consisting of a star of twelve points. An eagle holding three arrows is superimposed in the center. The shape of the medal was chosen to make it distinctive from all other decorations, and the eagle was taken from the Seal of the Secretary of Defense, under whose authority the medal is awarded. On the reverse, there is a circle composed of the following inscription (in raised letters): JOINT SERVICE (which comprises the upper portion of the circle) ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (which comprises the lower portion of the circle). The space in the center of the circle is left blank for inscribing the recipient's name. The ribbon consists of a center stripe of red flanked on either side by stripes of light blue, white, green, white, and blue.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has participated in a joint mission or training hosted by another United States based unit/clan and distinguishes themselves by showing professionalism befitting a member of the 2MRB RU.

  13. Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal

    History

    Awarded to members of the Navy and Marine Corps, including members of Reserve components on active or inactive duty, of the grade of lieutenant commander/major and junior thereto, for service performed on or after 1 May 1961. The award shall be given for meritorious service or achievement in a combat or noncombat situation based on sustained performance or specific achievement of a superlative nature, and shall be of such merit as to warrant more tangible recognition than is possible by a fitness report or evaluation sheet, but which does not warrant a Navy & Marine Corps Commendation Medal or higher. The Navy & Marine Corps Achievement Medal may also be awarded to members of the armed forces of a friendly foreign nation consistent with the eligibility requirements specified in chapter 6.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit for meritorious service or achievement in a combat or non-combat situation, in competitive match below that required for a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. Additionally, a member must have time in service of a minimum of 1 month to receive the award for meritorious service when combat is not involved. This award will be issued with a V device if combat is involved.

  14. Combat Action Ribbon

    History

    The U.S. Navy first authorized the Combat Action Ribbon on 17 February 1969. The CAR is awarded to members of the Navy and Marine Corps with the ranks of or lower than captain and colonel respectively. The Combat Action Ribbon, is a high precedence United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, and United States Marine Corps military decoration awarded to United States sea service members "who have actively participated in ground or surface combat." Additionally, Coast Guardsmen, Navy sailors, and Marines active in clandestine, stealth or special operations are deemed eligible for consideration of the award.

    Prerequisites

    This can be awarded to any member that participates in at least three operations within a deployment.

  15. Navy Unit Commendation

    History

    Established by order of the secretary of the Navy, 18 December 1944, it is awarded by the Secretary to any ship, aircraft, detachment, or other unit of the of the United States Navy or Marine Corps which has, subsequent to 6 December 1941, distinguished itself by outstanding heroism in action against the enemy, but no sufficiently enough to justify award of the Presidential Unit Citation.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit that is part of a functioning team where the team performs in an exceptionally meritorious manner above and beyond their peers in combat or non-combat. This award will be issued in competitive match below that required for a Presidential Unit Commendation.

  16. Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation

    History

    Established by order of the Secretary of the Navy, 17 July 1967, it is awarded by the Secretary to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps which has distinguished itself under combat or non-combat conditions, by either valorous or meritorious achievement compared to other units performing similar service, but not sufficient enough to justify award of the Navy Unit Commendation.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit that is part of a team in which has demonstrated valorous or meritorious achievement or service in combat or non-combat. This award will be issued in competitive match below that required for a Navy Unit Commendation.

  17. Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal

    History

    The Good Conduct Medal is one of the oldest military awards of the United States Armed Forces. The U.S. Navy's variant of the Good Conduct Medal was established in 1869, the Marine Corps version in 1896, the Coast Guard version in 1923, the Army version in 1941, and the Air Force version in 1963; the Air Force Good Conduct Medal was temporarily discontinued from February 2006 to February 2009, followed by its subsequent reinstatement.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit upon quarterly review for meeting a high standard of efficiency, loyalty and duty in the performance of their unit or staff shop functions to a level below that required for the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

  18. Navy Good Conduct Medal

    History

    The Good Conduct Medal is one of the oldest military awards of the United States Armed Forces. The U.S. Navy's variant of the Good Conduct Medal was established in 1869, the Marine Corps version in 1896, the Coast Guard version in 1923, the Army version in 1941, and the Air Force version in 1963; the Air Force Good Conduct Medal was temporarily discontinued from February 2006 to February 2009, followed by its subsequent reinstatement.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit upon quarterly review for meeting a high standard of efficiency, loyalty and duty in the performance of their unit or staff shop functions to a level below that required for the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

  19. Marine Corps Expeditionary Ribbon

    History

    The Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal is a military award of the United States Marine Corps. It was established on 8 May 1919 as the Marine Corps Expeditionary Ribbon. A full-sized medal was authorized on 1 March 1921. The Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal is therefore one of the oldest medals of the United States military which is still issued to active duty personnel.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who conducted a minimum of 6 combat operations in which they engaged in a landing on foreign territory, participated in combat operations against an opposing force, or must have participated in a designated operation or exercise during a given deployment.

  20. Navy Expeditionary Ribbon

    History

    The General Orders of the Department of the Navy which established the medal states, the medal will be awarded, to the officers and enlisted men of the Navy who shall have actually landed on foreign territory and engaged in operations against armed opposition, or operated under circumstances which, after full consideration, shall be deemed to merit special recognition and for which service no campaign medal has been awarded. The Navy Expeditionary Medal is retroactively authorized to February 12, 18.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who conducted a minimum of 6 combat operations in which they engaged in a landing on foreign territory, participated in combat operations against an opposing force, or must have participated in a designated operation or exercise during a given deployment.

  21. National Defense Service Medal (NDSM)

    History

    The National Defense Service Medal (NDSM) was established by President Eisenhower per Executive Order 10448, dated 22 April 1953, for service between 27 June 1950 and a date to be announced. On 17 June 1954, the Chief of Staff approved establishment of 27 July 1954 as the termination date for award of the NDSM. Executive Order 11265, dated 11 January 1966, amended Executive Order 10488, to include a termination date and authorized the Secretary of Defense to establish periods of eligibility subsequent to 31 December 1960. Eligibility for award, commencing with the period after 31 December 1960, was established by DOD Directive 1348.7, dated 1 April 1966, and terminated effective 15 August 1974, per letter from Manpower and Reserve Affairs, subject: Termination of Eligibility for the National Defense Service Medal, dated 30 June 1974. The NDSM was again authorized by memorandum, dated 20 February 1991, from Secretary of Defense Cheney for active service on or after 2 August 1990 with no termination date established. The termination date was later established as 30 November 1995. The NDSM was reinstated by memorandum from The Deputy Secretary of Defense, dated 26 April 2002, from 11 September 2001 to a termination date to be determined in the future. The Heraldic Division, Quartermaster General’s Office, was requested to provide proposed designs for the NDSM and designs created by Mr. T. H. Jones were submitted to the G1 on 26 May 1953. A committee appointed by DOD, which included representatives of all services, met on 27 May 1953 and 3 June 1953 and selected the design for final approval. The eagle, our National emblem, together with the shield of the Coat of Arms of the United States is used to symbolize the defense of the United States. The combination of oak and palm leaves signify strength and preparedness.

    Prerequisites

    The National Defense Service Medal shall be awarded to member that have served in their nation's Armed Forces. Photo proof must be sent to Command Staff for verification.

  22. Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (AFEM)

    History

    During the late 1950's, it became apparent that a medal was needed to recognize the services of the Armed Forces who participated in the increased involvement of the American military in peacekeeping activities. As a result, President Kennedy established the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, per Executive Order 10977, dated 4 December 1961, for operations on or after 1 July 1958. In a memorandum dated 20 December 1961, the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense requested that The Institute of Heraldry submit proposed designs as soon as possible. Proposed designs were submitted on 25 January 1962 and a design, created by Mr. Jay Morris, was tentatively selected. The design was submitted to the Commission of Fine Arts for comments prior to approval by the Deputy Secretary of Defense on 24 April 1962. The selected design uses the eagle to represent the strength of our Armed Forces, and the sword, loose in its scabbard, denotes the readiness to serve wherever needed, as further suggested by the compass rose. At the present time, JCS has designated 22 operations for which the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal may be awarded. A bronze service star is worn to denote second and subsequent awards of the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. Each Service may authorize the use of campaign streamers for operations in the designated areas. The Army has authorized campaign credit and display of streamers for three areas: Grenada, Panama and the Dominican Republic. The Air Force has authorized display of streamers for all 22 operations. The Navy authorizes display of three silver stars and four bronze stars on the streamer representing 19 operations.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who conducted a minimum of 3 combat operations in which they engaged in a landing on foreign territory, participated in combat operations against an opposing force, or must have participated in a designated operation or exercise during a given deployment. This award will be issued  in competitive match below that required for a Navy or Marine Corps Expeditionary Ribbon.

  23. Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (GWOTE-M)

    History

    On 20 September 2002, the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, requested the Institute provide suggested designs. This was accomplished and the design was selected on 7 January 2003. Executive Order 13289, dated 12 March 2003, signed by President Bush, established this medal. The Office of The Under Secretary of Defense approved additions to the designated geographical areas of eligibility on 21 March 2005.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has deployed with the unit to a region controlled by terrorists and has assisted in the search for and removal of the terrorists and/or assisted with missions regarding terrorist plots in no less than six official operations.

  24. Global War on Terrorism Service Medal (GWOTS-M)

    History

    On 20 September 2002, the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, requested the Institute provide suggested designs. This was accomplished and the design was selected on 7 January 2003. Executive Order 13289, dated 12 March 2003, signed by President Bush, established this medal.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has conducted a minimum of 3 official operations within a deployment to combat terrorism.

  25. Armed Forces Service Medal (AFSM)

    History

    On 2 March 1995, the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Force Management Policy) (OASD-RMP) requested that The Institute of Heraldry prepare a medal and ribbon design for the proposed Armed Forces Service Medal. This medal was to be awarded to members of the Armed Forces who participated as members of units involved in military operations of significant numbers with no foreign armed opposition or the threat of imminent hostile action. This medal is intended to meet a void in the criteria between the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal and the Humanitarian Service Medal. Proposed design was forwarded by OASD-FMP to the Services and the Joint Staff. Concurrence in the establishment of the medal from the Services and the Joint Staff was received and the proposal was forwarded to the Office of Budget and Management (OMB) for issuance of an Executive Order. The medal was authorized by Executive Order 12985, dated 11 January 1996.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has been assigned to non-combat positions in addition to their combat billet and serve with distinction for a period of 3 months or longer.

  26. Humanitarian Service Medal (HSM)

    History

    The Humanitarian Service Medal was established by President Ford per Executive Order 11965, dated 19 January 1977. The order provided for award for participation in a military operation of a humanitarian nature subsequent to 1 April 1975. The policy and award criteria for the Humanitarian Service Medal was established by Department of Defense Directive 1348.25, dated 23 June 1977. Proposed medals were submitted to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) for approval 18 April 1977 and the selected design was approved by OSD on 10 May 1977. The design by Mr. Jay Morris, The Institute of Heraldry, uses the outstretched hand with palm up as the international symbol for aid and assistance. On the reverse, the oak sprig is symbolic of strength imparted through a selfless mission to aid mankind. The color purple in the ribbon stands for self-sacrifice, white for regeneration and blue for universal friendship. In addition, the two shades of blue are the colors used in the flags of OSD.

    Prerequisites

    The Humanitarian Service Medal shall be awarded to members of the 2d Marine Raiders who distinguish themselves by meritorious direct participation in any significant online act or operation of a humanitarian nature approved by Command Staff. Additionally the medal is awarded for participation in areas of helping others with technical issues (such as web design, graphics, signatures and general computer problems) or morale support to fellow members in times of need outside of operations.

  27. Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal (MOVSM)

    History

    The Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal (MOVSM) was established by Executive Order 12830, 9 January 1993. It may be awarded to members of the Armed Forces of the United States and their Reserve Components, who subsequent to 31 December 1992, perform outstanding volunteer community service of a sustained direct and consequential nature.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who donates in excess of $50 in any calendar month. A "V" device is added for donations in excess of $100 in any calendar month.

  28. Marine Corps Recruiting Ribbon

    History

    The Marine Corps Recruiting Ribbon was authorized by order of the Secretary of the Navy on June 7, 1995 with retroactive presentations to January 1, 1973. The Marine Corps Recruiting Ribbon is awarded to Marine Corps officers and enlisted personnel who complete a standard 36-month tour in a United States Marine Corps Recruiting Command.

    Prerequisites

    May be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has recruited 10 accepted applicants into the unit.

  29. Navy Recruiting Service Ribbon

    History

    The Navy Recruiting Service Ribbon was established by order of the Secretary of the Navy in February 1989. The first issuance of the award was made on June 1 of that same year with the award retroactive to July 1, 1973.

    To be awarded the Navy Recruiting Service Ribbon, a service member must be assigned to one of the United States Navy’s Major Recruiting Commands and must complete a standard three-year tour of duty. Award of the Navy Recruiting Service Ribbon is open to all branches of the Navy, including reservists on active duty for special work (ADSW) programs.

    Prerequisites

    May be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has recruited 10 accepted applicants into the unit.

  30. Marine Corps Drill Instructor Ribbon

    History

    U.S. Marine Corps Drill Instructor Ribbon was created in July 1997 and recognizes those members of the United States Marine Corps who have successfully trained and qualified as Marine Corps Drill Instructors. To qualify, a Marine must hold the Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) of 0911 (Drill Instructor) or must have served a successful tour of duty.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a Cadre of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has completed two tours of duty in the Marine Raider Training Company.

  31. Navy Recruit Training Ribbon

    History

    The Navy Accession Training Service Ribbon was created in March 1998 by order of the Secretary of the Navy. The ribbon is retroactive to October 1995 and recognizes those officers and enlisted members of the United States (U.S.) Navy who have successfully completed the prescribed tour of duty within a training command.

    Prerequisites

    It will be awarded to a Cadre of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has completed two tours of duty in the Marine Raider Training Company.

  32. North Atlantic Treaty Organization Medal (NATO)

    History

    The NATO Medal is a decoration presented by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to recognize international NATO military members who have participated in various peacekeeping operations. There are currently numerous versions of the NATO Medal in existence, for service in Yugoslavia, Kosovo, the Republic of Macedonia, two for service during Article 5 operations (Eagle Assist, Active Endeavour), and eight for Non-Article 5 NATO operations (ISAF, Resolute Support, Balkans, NTM-Iraq, Africa, AMIS, OUP-Libya, and Pakistan). In addition, there are corresponding clasps for operations such as ISAF, Kosovo, Yugoslavia, NTM-Iraq and clasps designating Article 5, and Non-Article 5 designations. There is also a NATO Meritorious Service Medal, with a “Meritorious Service” clasp as well.

    Prerequisites

    May be awarded to a member of the 2d Marine Raider Battalion Realism Unit who has participated in a joint mission or training hosted by another foreign unit/clan and distinguishes themselves by showing professionalism befitting a member of the 2MRB RU.

Badges

  1. Marine Special Operator Insignia

  2. Fleet Marine Force

  3. Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia

  4. Combatant Diver

  5. Rifle Expert - USMC

  6. Rifle Sharpshooter - USMC

  7. Rifle Marksman - USMC

  8. Pistol Expert - USMC

  9. Pistol Sharpshooter - USMC

  10. Pistol Marksman - USMC

  11. Rifle Expert - USN

  12. Rifle Sharpshooter - USN

  13. Rifle Marksman - USN

  14. Pistol Expert - USN

  15. Pistol Sharpshooter - USN

  16. Pistol Marksman - USN

Campaign Ribbons

  1. Operation White Caiman

  2. Operation Red Mirage

  3. Operation Yeti Fury

  4. Operation Baltic Blitz

  5. Operation Sand Serpent

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